Tuesday, July 31, 2012

50 Shades of Red: Losing our Shirts to Ebooks | American Libraries Magazine

James LaRue, Director of the Douglas County Libraries
50 Shades of Red: Losing our Shirts to Ebooks | American Libraries Magazine




This post was written by James LaRue, Director of the Douglas County Libraries in Colorado, and member of the ALA Digital Content Working Group. More of LaRue's writing can be found on his site

For decades, public libraries have seen steady gains in use. We check out more books, get more visits both physical and virtual, and have more kids at storytime. At my own library, we've seen double digit growth almost every year for over 20 years running.
Until last year. The drop wasn't big — about .7 percent. But from such little shifts come major seismic realignments. [Read more...]
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Monday, July 30, 2012

Walking to 'Middlemarch' - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Walking to 'Middlemarch' - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

By Sanford Pinsker

I first walked down the streets of Middlemarch and met its vivid inhabitants when I was an earnest 20-year-old English major. For me, George Eliot's classic novel was not an assigned reading in a "British Novel" class; instead, it was the sort of work I took on faith. Middlemarch, I had discovered, was the 19th-century British novel. No self-respecting English major could graduate without reading it, which was incentive enough for me. (Read more...)

Pat Kinsella for The Chronicle Review




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Thursday, July 26, 2012

The Benefits of Faculty-Librarian Collaborations | Faculty Focus

The Benefits of Faculty-Librarian Collaborations | Faculty Focus

By: in Instructional Design July 16, 2012

Community College instructors have a great deal to teach: study skills, a college orientation to education, and the actual course information for their discipline. They also know that their students must be information literate, must know how to find supplementary information for each course, how to use information effectively, and how to credit their sources appropriately. In this regard, Washington State Community and Technical Colleges have been working under an LSTA grant on Information Literacy from 2008-2012 (Washington). Lower Columbia College libraries have been using the grant to integrate librarians or library tutorials into face-to-face and online classes, thereby offering information literacy instruction to students without increasing the teaching load of the discipline instructors. When incorporated with research assignments, this instruction, along with embedded librarians, facilitates both student learning and faculty grading of assignments. Read more...

Andrea Gillaspy-Steinhilper is a reference librarian at Lower Columbia College.
References:
Business Administration subject guide.” (rev. 2011) Lower Columbia College Library Services. Retrieved May 2012 from http://lowercolumbia.edu/nr/exeres/9CC35863-7A1D-4F77-88D0-6E2E2F083DC9.
“Determining the level of scholarship, authorship, and audience of an article.” (2011). Lower Columbia College Library Services. Retrieved 29 June 2012 from https://lstahighlights.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/ppt_scholarly_v_popular.pdf.
GillaspySteinhilper, A. (Winter 2012). “Cancer and genetic mutations.” Tegrity Recording. Lower Columbia College Library Services. Retrieved 11 May 2012 from https://tegr.it/y/aom1.
Washington State Community and Technology Colleges LSTA Grant 2008-2012. (25 April 2012). Retrieved 11 May 2012 from http://informationliteracywactc.pbworks.com/w/page/19923193/FrontPage.
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Cassidy Tucker (CassJayTuck) On How To Read A Book (VIDEO)

Cassidy Tucker (CassJayTuck) On How To Read A Book (VIDEO)

Is the Academic Publishing Industry on the Verge of Disruption? - US News and World Report

Is the Academic Publishing Industry on the Verge of Disruption? - US News and World Report


As Harvard balks at subscription cost and others take a page from its book, open access publishers get a fresh look

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Have E-readers Killed the Bookcover? | The Hub

Have E-readers Killed the Bookcover? | The Hub


Last year, during a teen book club meeting at the local high school, the subject of e-readers came up … who has one, who wants one, what do teens think, etc. But one of the teens shared something interesting: having an e-reader has changed what she reads. Why? Not because of the anonymity an e-reader lends, and only a bit because of the limited availability of digital downloads through the library. Instead, her reading choices have changed mainly due to (the lack of) browsability. Instead of being able to peruse the stacks, physically handle books, and look at their covers, she was stuck trying to determine her choices from itty-bitty thumbnail shots of book covers and too-laborious-to-access descriptions. To avoid all the trouble, this particular student began to read digitized classics because their titles, and covers, were recognizable. Her points made sense because — let’s face it — thumbnail shots of book covers leave much to be desired, especially if that is all one sees when “browsing” digital materials online. Read more ...


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