Wednesday, September 17, 2014

New York City Public Library Branches Need $1.1 Billion in Repairs: Report - WSJ

A patron upstairs at Brooklyn Public Library's 111-year-old Pacific branch in Boerum Hill; 'The current condition of New York City's libraries greatly impedes our ability to fully support the incredible talent, creativity and potential of New Yorkers,' said library President Linda Johnson

New York's public library branches need $1.1 billion to fix leaky roofs, broken air-conditioning systems and a host of other problems, according to a report released Monday by the Center for an Urban Future, a New York-based think tank.
The report argues that the city has a "broken funding system" in which libraries rely too much on discretionary funds from City Council members. It calls on Mayor Bill de Blasio to create a citywide capital plan for libraries and to double capital spending on libraries over the next 10 years.
"Mayor de Blasio recognizes the important role that libraries play in providing critical services to New Yorkers, which is why this administration is taking a new approach to invest in and partner with and support libraries," said a spokeswoman for the mayor. Read more...

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Mapping ‘Madeline’ Creator’s New York Haunts by Allison Meier on July 30, 2014

The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.




.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf
The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.




.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf
The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf
The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf
The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf
The artist behind the beloved book series "Madeline" is in the spotlight at the New York Historical Society.

"Madeline
in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans" is an exhibit that celebrates
Madeline's 75th anniversary with more than 90 pieces of art.

Although the series is based in Paris, Bemelmans was living in New York when he wrote and illustrated the books.

"Madeline
is such a special character, she just speaks to me of bravery and
adventure and that can-do American spirit that we America girls all
aspire to," said curator Jane Bayard Curley.

The collection will be on display through mid-October.

For more information go online to NYhistory.org.


- See more at:
http://manhattan.ny1.com/content/news/212839/-madeline--exhibit-comes-to-new-york-historical-society/#sthash.NLjpDIR9.dpuf








HyperAllergic
July 30, 2014 
To mark the centenary of the children’s book author and illustrator stepping into Gotham, the New-York Historical Society opened Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans earlier this month. In conjunction with the exhibition, illustrator Adrienne Ottenberg created a map of “Bemelmans’ New York.”
Madeline, the smallest of the “twelve little girls in two straight lines” who lived in “an old house in Paris that was covered in vines,” was born in Manhattan. In Pete’s Tavern on Irving Place in 1938, Ludwig Bemelmans scrawled those first rhyming lines that would introduce his petite heroine of the Madeline books.
 “And sometimes they were very sad,” 1939 Madeline (Simon & Schuster, 1939) Watercolor and gouache Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection TM and © Ludwig Bemelmans, LLC.

Ludwig Bemelmans, “And sometimes they were very sad” from Madeline (Simon & Schuster, 1939), Watercolor and gouache (Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection,  © Ludwig Bemelmans)







Watch video
Bemelmans, born of a German mother and Belgian father, arrived in New York City in 1914, passing his first night stranded on Ellis Island after his dad forgot to meet him. To mark the centenary of the children’s book author and illustrator stepping into Gotham, the New-York Historical Society opened Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans earlier this month. In conjunction with the exhibition, illustrator Adrienne Ottenberg created a map of “Bemelmans’ New York.”
















Wait. Stop. What is a photocopy? Three insights from our Library Student Advisory Board




September 10, 2014, 4:04 pm  By Brian Mathews The Ubiquitous Librarian
 
The mission of our Library Student Advisory Board is to help us gain a better understanding of the student experience at our university. We talk about a lot of different ideas and issues. I want to share three that surprised me.


Photocopying? We were talking about printing and I asked the students if they ever photocopied (we have all-in-one machines that do printing, copying, and scanning) and the students were silent. After some strange looks someone finally asked what’s a photocopy?
Apparently everything is a print these days. Reproduction of a page of paper doesn’t seem to be a very common activity. I explained what it was and felt like I was describing a telegraph. I guess with journals migrating to predominately digital formats that most undergrads do not need to photocopy articles. Most of their own content is digital as well — so there is no copying notes, forms, or anything like that. Next time I might tour them around the microfilm and VCRs.
Note: the grad students knew about photocopying
Reservable study space? No thanks. Last semester I asked them about offering a few desks or study carrels that students could reserve. Instead of hunting around for a quiet place to read, what if you could schedule it? The group was unanimously opposed. They felt this was fine for group spaces because people needed to assemble at an appointed time, but they didn’t want to see this for individuals. They preferred the first-come-first-serve approach and said that it is hard to predict in advance exactly when you might study; the logistics involved didn’t seem worthwhile.
Share my data, please. Another theme we discussed was personal data. Students said it would be helpful to have a simple dashboard where they could see how busy the library is at a given time. They were not particularly interested in desktop computer availability (which is easy to provide) but more focused on the inventory of quiet area seating and group tables. An engineer in the group started mapping out how we could do this with sensors but with 1,000+ seats that could be challenging.
The suggestion that received the most traction was requiring students to swipe their ID cards when they accessed the building. They do this now at the gym, residential halls, and various computer labs: it’s not usual. I brought up the concept of privacy but that didn’t resonate with them. The consensus was that if the data could be compiled and shared in a meaningful way (generally displaying the busyness of the building) that it would be valuable to them.
Secondly, they thought it might be useful for the library and other campus planners to gather accurate demographics: how many first-year students are using the library, how many engineering students, how long people tended to stay in the library, etc. We talked a bit about the value of these analytics— they brought this up, not me.
The eye-opener for me was how surprised they were that we were not already collecting this information. We do require students to swipe their ID after midnight, but they were advocating for something more. It’s always interesting to see things through the ever-changing eyes of the user.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

The great Internet Slowdown: Join tomorrow’s protest against the FCC’s new net neutrality rules | ExtremeTech







Tomorrow,
September 10, will mark the first great Internet Slowdown — a protest
by some of the web’s largest companies over the FCC and US government’s
handling of net neutrality. All across the web, on sites such as Reddit,
Netflix, and WordPress, a spinning “loading…” icon will appear,
reminding everyone that internet slow lanes — where some websites load
more slowly than others if you don’t pay your ISP some extra money — are
a real possibility unless we write to our country’s lawmakers now. Let me state this clearly: The end of net neutrality would be bad for everyone on the internet except your ISP.



The Internet Slowdown
is being arranged by Battle for the Net, a fairly large concerted
effort of organizations and people who are trying their best to support
net neutrality. Battle for the Net appears to be an off-shoot of Fight for the Future, a nonprofit that popped up during the battle against SOPA and PIPA.
Some fairly big companies and organizations have joined the Battle for
the Net, including the EFF, ACLU, Kickstarter, Tumblr, Vimeo,
iFixit, and Reddit. On September 10, many of these companies — and some
other latecomers, such as Netflix — will be displaying a “spinning wheel
of death” to symbolize how the FCC’s proposed net neutrality rules
would create internet fast lanes and slow lanes. Read more...

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

6 Ways To Become a Power User of the Public Library - BOOK RIOT


You have a library card and you know the library is more than just a “Netflix for books.”
Maybe you know about your library’s ebook offerings and maybe you know
you can borrow audiobooks or DVDs. But how can you make the absolute
most out of your local library? Here are 6 tips for becoming a power
user of the public library.




Worth noting: not all public libraries offer the same
services, so not everything mentioned here will be available to all
users. Some libraries offer more and some may offer less. These
variations exist because of funding differences, library size, location,
and a host of other factors, most of which are out of control of the
library itself. The one common denominator among these tips, though, is
that they’re all things you can ask about at your library.




Likewise, this is geared toward the American public library system, so your mileage in other countries may vary.


BLD0085361. Get to the top of the holds list for hot titles


Did you know many libraries order books well in advance of their
publication date? Librarians are knowledgable about what’s coming out,
and they often put in purchase orders for titles weeks, if not
months, before publication. This is especially true for books that are
garnering buzz or are new titles by popular authors.




Many times, those titles appear in the library catalog not long after
the order is placed. Even if the book isn’t on shelf, when the library
has ordered a title and it shows up in the catalog, chances are good you
can put a hold on it.




Say you’re reading our 5 To Watch For
feature and you see a title coming out at the end of the month that
looks great. Go to your library’s catalog and see if you can put a hold
on it. If you can’t do the hold from home, call the library and try
to do it over the phone. This’ll get you ahead of the game, and you’ll
be one of the first people to read the book, likely not long after it
releases.  Read more...