Monday, May 22, 2017

11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates | Off|-the-Shelf

Reader's advisory | Books | Inspiration

At the George Washington University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today. Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11 commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.
Congratulations to the Class of 2017!
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates

At the George Washington University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today. Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11 commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.
Congratulations to the Class of 2017!
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

Congratulations, by the Way
by George Saunders

Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
At the George Washington University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today. Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11 commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.
Congratulations to the Class of 2017!
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

Congratulations, by the Way
by George Saunders

Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

Congratulations, by the Way
by George Saunders

Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
At the George Washington University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today. Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11 commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.
Congratulations to the Class of 2017!
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
At the George Washington University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today. Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11 commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.
Congratulations to the Class of 2017!
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates

At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

Congratulations, by the Way
by George Saunders

Months after George Saunders gave the commencement address at Syracuse University, its transcript—posted on the New York Times website—was shared more than a million times. Saunders’s words, now memorialized in CONGRATULATIONS, BY THE WAY, tap into the shared desire to lead kinder and more fulfilling lives.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf
At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates

At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates

At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

11 Inspiring Reads for Recent Graduates

At the George Washington
University 2010 commencement, Michelle Obama gave an awe-inspiring
address and a call to action, which I know my fellow classmates have
since carried out in their lives. “Keep going. Keep giving. Keep
engaging,” she told us, and her words still inspire my passions today.
Graduation season often contains a cocktail of emotion: from joy to
confusion to anxiety to relief. Luckily for the class of 2017, there are
words—spoken and written—to help with the transition to the next stage
in life and beyond.  Even if you’re not graduating, this time of
year—the flowers, the weather, and the sunshine—often brings welcome
feelings of new beginnings after a long, dark winter. Here are 11
commencement speakers—and their cherished books—to guide you through
whatever new beginning awaits you this summer.


Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

- See more at:
http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/11-inspiring-reads-for-recent-graduates/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.9hmBL4jq.dpuf

Thursday, May 18, 2017

3 Common Mistakes in Working With Homeless Patrons | Niche Academy

Homeless | Public libraries | Public service | Library training

March 6, 2017 by Jared Oates


If you work regularly with homeless patrons, you've likely encountered uncomfortable situations where communication seems to fail despite your best efforts. This article describes three common mistakes that can turn a merely uncomfortable situation volatile: "parenting" a patron, waiting, and worrying about gender. The advice here comes from Ryan Dowd, a man with decades of experience serving and working with the homeless. This article defines those three mistakes and offers guidelines to counteract them to help you diffuse, rather than escalate, tense situations.

Don't "parent"

"Parenting," in this context is about a voice register that is used to communicate with someone of a lower social status than the speaker. A "parent" voice presumes the authoritative position of the speaker and is characterized by judgemental statements. It is also usually accompanied by a tone of voice that may be condescending, clipped, or artificially sweet. 


Library hosting workshops on ‘adulting’ | Heather Laura Clarke | 05-14-20107

Public libraries | Library services | Adult education |Adulting

Halifax Public Libraries found they were serving lots of people from most age ranges and life experiences, but weren’t seeing many “new adults” come through the library doors. Their adulting series has changed that. (123RF)   
Libraries across the HRM offer programming for babies, kids, teens, adults and seniors, but Jocelyn Covert saw that there was a noticeable absence of one particular demographic.

“We have lots of families with young children, and lots of seniors, but there’s this entire age range — university through the early 20s — we don’t get to see very much,” says Covert, youth service librarian with the Bedford Library.

In library lingo, this demographic is referred to as “new adults.” No one could figure out how to get these young people through the doors until Covert came up with the idea for a How to Adult series.

“Talking about ‘adulting’ or saying you ‘just can’t adult today’ has become a trending theme, and we’re always searching for opportunities to bring in new users, so I just thought I could put the two together,” says Covert. Read more...

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

WikiTRIBUNE: Evidence-based journalism | Jimmy Wales, founder Wikipedia

Journalism | News | Community

 

A new kind of news platform.

Wikitribune is a news platform that brings journalists and a community of volunteers together.
We want to make sure that you read fact-based articles that have a real impact in both local and global events. And that stories can be easily verified and improved.

 

 

 

“A news site with a
sense of community.”

Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia
Wikitribune is led by Jimmy Wales who has surrounded himself with an amazing group of people to bring Wikitribune to life.

American Writers Museum is Chicago’s New Literary Paradise | Amy Diegelman

Museums | Writers | Literature

May 16, 2017


“It’s an affirmation that we are a literary people.” That was how Anna Castillo expressed the impact of the new (and first) American Writers Museum. Castillo, a Latina poet, Chicago native, and author of So Far From God, was joined by Rosellen Brown, author of Cora Fry’s Pillow Book, for a discussion to open the museum’s press day in Chicago. The topic that dominated the conversation was the modern, evolving culture of writing in America. It couldn’t have been more appropriate.

The Children’s Hall    
 Read more...

Member of the Week: Susanne M. Markgren | ACRLinsider \ May 17, 2017



Member of the Week: Susanne M. Markgren:

Susanne M. Markgren is the assistant director for technical services at Manhattan College in Riverdale, New York. Susanne first joined ACRL in 2008 and is your ACRL member of the week for May 15, 2017.


1. Describe yourself in three words: Adaptable, inquisitive, resilient.


2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m currently obsessed with short stories, and I’m alternating between these three amazing collections: Joy Williams’ The Visiting Privilege, Lucia Berlin’s A Manual for Cleaning Women, and Clarice Lispector’s Complete Stories.
In the car and on walks, I like to listen to The Moth Radio Hour, or The Moth Podcast. True stories, well told. Totally addictive.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Scalable, motivational, community. Read more...

Note: Stephanie L. Gross (blog owner) has served as a mentor with ACRL/NY with Susanne Markgren as Program Coordinator since the program's inception six years ago.  For more information about Susanne and the program:

Susanne Markgren
ACRL/NY Mentoring Program Coordinator
email: acrlnymentoring@gmail.com
http://acrlny.org/

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Public Outcry Saves Saskatchewan Library Funds

Library advocacy | Public libraries | Access |Funding | Activism

Drop Everything and Read rally, Fox Valley, Sask.
Photo credit: Susan Rose
  


In an abrupt about-face, the provincial government of Saskatchewan, Canada, on April 24 restored every penny of the $4.8 million it had cut just a month earlier from public library funding as part of its 2017–18 budget. It was a reversal that elected officials admit was prompted by mounting public opposition to the cuts, spurred in part by a Facebook group that sprang up almost overnight to energize many grassroots protests.

The announcement by Saskatchewan Education Minister Don Morgan wrapped up a tumultuous five weeks in which a determined and unified library community prevailed over what were considered long odds.

They saw thousands of petition signatures, a claim by Morgan that usage had declined significantly and some parts of Saskatchewan might have too many libraries—rebutted point by point by the nonprofit Saskatchewan Library Association (SLA)—sinking poll numbers for the political party in power, a protest aimed directly at elected officials, and a sudden halt to Saskatchewan’s popular interlibrary loan system. Read more...


Helen Keller Writes a Letter to Nazi Students Before They Burn Her Book: “History Has Taught You Nothing If You Think You Can Kill Ideas” (1933)

Book burning | Holocaust | Diversity

Open culture  | History May 16, 2017

Helen Keller achieved notoriety not only as an individual success story, but also as 
 prolific essayist, activist, and fierce advocate for poor and marginalized people. She “was a lifelong radical,” writes Peter Dreier at Yes! magazine, whose “investigation into the causes of blindness” eventually led her to “embrace socialism, feminism, and pacifism.” Keller supported the NAACP and ACLU, and protested strongly against patronizing calls for her to “confine my activities to social service and the blind.” Her critics, she wrote, mischaracterized her ideas as “a Utopian dream, and one who seriously contemplates its realization indeed must be deaf, dumb, and blind.”

Twenty years later she found a different set of readers treating her ideas with contempt. This time, however, the critics were in Nazi Germany, and instead of simply disagreeing with her, they added her collection of essays, How I Became a Socialist, to a list of “degenerate” books to be burned on May 10, 1933. Such was the date chosen by Hitler for “a nationwide ‘Action Against the Un-German Spirit,’” writes Rafael Medoff, to take place at German Universities—“a series of public burnings of the banned books” that “differed from the Nazis’ perspective on political, social, or cultural matters, as well as all books by Jewish authors.”  Read more...

Monday, May 15, 2017

Argentina's page turner: How a Canadian author became the leader of a library revolution

Libraries | Alberto Manguel | Culture

The National Library of Argentina sits at the epicentre of the country's cultural life. So when government officials appointed Alberto Manguel – native son and longtime Canadian anthologist – to radically rethink the institution, pushback from the intellectual elite was all but certain. Stephanie Nolen reports on an irascible scribe's rocky tenure

A few years after Jorge Luis Borges, left, ended his tenure as head of Argentina’s National Library, he began a friendship with Alberto Manguel, right, then a teenager in Buenos Aires. Argentina’s greatest writer was, by that time, blind, and invited the young Mr. Manguel to come home and read aloud to him, which Mr. Manguel went on to do many times over the next few years. Now, Mr. Manguel has taken Mr. Borges’s former role at the library.



Alberto Manguel is harried. A stream of wealthy Argentines, all stiletto heels and elegant umbrellas, is leaving his office in the National Library; he hopes to cultivate them as donors, and ushers them to the door with awkward pleasantries. A line of employees with requests waits in the hall, hoping to catch him. An assistant brandishes a clipboard thick with demands: There is a committee, but there is also a meeting, he is expected imminently at a luncheon, and there's this journalist, and – "I've abandoned my previous persona: I detested nothing more than lunches and cocktails and meetings and groups of more than three people," Mr. Manguel says with a sigh and a valiant attempt at a smile, when he has retreated back behind the office door. "And I'm spending my life doing this."

Back in December of 2015, Mr. Manguel was living in New York and teaching at Columbia and Princeton; he opened his e-mail one day to find a startling request from a stranger. The newly appointed Minister of Culture for Argentina was wondering if Mr. Manguel would consider returning to the country where he was born – and which he left 50 years ago – to serve as director of the storied National Library. Mr. Manguel says he assumed at first it was a joke – "What next, being Pope?"Read more...

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Fake News Edition | WNYC

Fake news | Media | Podcast

November 18, 2016


Monday, May 8, 2017

14 Books by Diverse Authors You Need to Read Right Now -

Reader's advisory | Diversity in literature | Multiculturalism

Part of the magic of books is discovering new places, new cultures, new perspectives, and new characters that change the way we think about and interact with the world. These 14 remarkable contemporary novels by a diverse group of authors will introduce you to a plethora of eye-opening experiences and will greatly enrich your literary diet.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

 by Taylor Noel | Monday 08, 2017

 

 

ehold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Behold the Dreamers

By Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival. - See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

 Behold the Dreamers  is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.

Read more...

 

ehold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

ehold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

 

Behold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

Behold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

Behold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

Behold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue

BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is the compassionate and illuminating story of a Cameroonian immigrant hungry for the American Dream but struggling to make ends meet in Harlem with his wife at the start of the Great Recession. When the financial world crashes, their lives are dramatically upended, and Jende and Neni must choose between their dreams, each other, and survival.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf
Part of the magic of books is discovering new places, new cultures, new perspectives, and new characters that change the way we think about and interact with the world. These 14 remarkable contemporary novels by a diverse group of authors will introduce you to a plethora of eye-opening experiences and will greatly enrich your literary diet.
- See more at: http://offtheshelf.com/2017/05/14-books-by-diverse-authors-you-need-to-read-right-now/?cp_type=OfftheShelf&rmid=OFF_THE_SHELF&rrid=6828250#sthash.8CuUo3hX.rWJnKpyM.dpuf

People who read books tend to be nicer than those who don't - [study]

Culture | Books | Reading



Reading: pretty good, apparently Credit: Danny Lawson/PA Wire 
 
Does reading books make you a nicer person? Or are nicer people more likely to be drawn to reading?

A recent study by researchers at Kingston University found that people who read works of fiction tend to be kinder and more empathetic.

"Exposure to fiction relates to a range of empathetic abilities," said researchers, who addressed the British Psychological Society conference in Brighton last week. Read more...

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Google to Revise Search Rankings to Downplay Fake News, Hate Speech | April 25, 2017

Fake news | Google | Information retrieval

by Wayne Rash

NEWS ANALYSIS: Google says it will downgrade the search rank of websites that show a clear pattern of distributing fake news, hate speech or deliberately misleading information.


By now you’re familiar with the problem of fake news. Some sites, claiming to provide news actually work with an agenda to present stories that spread their point of view, regardless of any connection with the facts.

The issue of fake news or what used to be known as political propaganda, came to the forefront during the presidential campaign in 2016, when it appears that the Russian government was working to help create and spread fake news in an effort to derail the campaign of Hillary Clinton.

Such efforts are continuing in Europe during current elections in Germany and France and again the Russian government is suspected to be backing those efforts. But fake news isn’t just the purview of the Russians. A number of right-wing and “alt-right” groups are also hard at work doing the same thing. Read more...

Monday, April 24, 2017

Meet the 13-Year-Old Pakistani Girl on a Mission to Read the World | April 24, 2017

Reading | Books | World Book Day | Literature

Celebrating World Book Day Every Day






A year ago, 12-year-old Aisha Esbhani, sitting in her home in Karachi, Pakistan, looked up at her bookshelf and realized that it was filled almost entirely with books by North American and British authors. Dissatisfied, Esbhani set herself a major challenge: to read a book from every country in the world, “as well as some extra territories.” To get help, she started a Facebook page for her project, and sent out a call for recommendations.

Not a usual project for a teenager, perhaps. When I asked Esbhani how she became such an avid reader, she told me that as a child, her mother would buy her books like Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella—but while she loved the movies, “the books never really caught my interest. Then, my brother gave me A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. That series began my reading journey!” Well, I’m sure she’s not alone in that regard. Read more...


Tips for Donating Old Books Without Being A Jerk | by Peter Derk 03-27-2017

Books | Libraries | Donations


I work at two places that accept donations of used books: a library and a bookstore that serves as a front for a non-profit. Okay, the bookstore funds the non-profit. It’s not a “front.” But “front” sounds more crime-y and thrilling.

When spring rolls around, both places are inundated with book donations. Especially now that we’ve all learned the life-saving magic of throwing away a bunch of our bullshit. (Thanks a lot, Marie Kondo. I’ll curse your name as I succumb to the sentient pile of dust mites that comes in with the 150th box of books from someone’s attic).

Donating books is a great thing to do. Most of the time.

The thing is, it can be a big help, it can make your space more calming, but you can also create more work for an organization you set out to help. If you donate books without taking a couple steps first, you can do more harm than good. Which is sort of fun in its own way, and if you wanted to be the Joker, the “let the world burn” person of your local library, I guess this is a relatively good option.

But if you really want to tidy up your life while also benefiting a local organization, here are some steps. Read more...



Thursday, April 20, 2017

How to Read a Whole Damn Book Every Week | by Kevin Nguyen

Books | Reading | Tips

It may sound difficult, but the secret to reading a book every week is to not be precious about it.
Every year, I read over a hundred books. This means I polish off somewhere between two and three books a week. I'm not saying that to brag (okay, I am), but I really believe that anyone can make time to read. Chances are you wish you read more, since everyone feels this way (except me, I’m amazing). The secret is to not think of reading as a precious thing. If you’re only going to open a book on the off chance you have several hours to kill in a comfy chair with a glass of scotch, it’s only ever going to happen when you have several hours to kill in a comfy chair with a glass of scotch.

Being well read means making it a part of your daily life—not treating it as a luxury. And it’s not that hard. Like all things, it just takes a little bit of discipline and a little bit of trickery. Read more...

Opening of UN files on Holocaust will 'rewrite chapters of history' | Monday 17 April 2017

Holocaust | Archives | Jewish history | War crimes

Survivors visit the former Auschwitz-Birkenau camp in Poland on the anniversary of its liberation. Photograph: Kuba Ociepa/Agencja Gazeta/Reuters

 Archive used in prosecution of Nazis reveals detailed evidence of death camps and genocide previously unseen by public

by Owen Bowcott

War crimes files revealing early evidence of Holocaust death camps that was smuggled out of eastern Europe are among tens of thousands of files to be made public for the first time this week.

The once-inaccessible archive of the UN war crimes commission, dating back to 1943, is being opened by the Wiener Library in London with a catalogue that can be searched online.


Anne Frank Who? Museums Combat Ignorance About the Holocaust | MARCH 21, 2017

Museums | Holocaust | Exhibitions

By NINA SIEGAL

Anne Frank in 1939, six years before her death. Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images 
 
 
AMSTERDAM — “She hid Jews?”

Aleatha Hinds, 17, ventured a guess about Anne Frank’s identity as she waited in line for two hours recently to enter the museum devoted to that world-famous diarist, who hid with her family in a secret annex for 25 months during World War II.

“No, no, no!” replied several friends, all 11th and 12th graders from the St. Charles College high school in Ontario. “She was Jewish!” they corrected her, in unison.
“She was hiding in her father’s factory,” said Eric LeBreton, 16. “The Nazis were looking for all the Jewish people because Hitler was trying to do genocide.”

With attendance swelling to 1.3 million annually, from one million in 2010, the Anne Frank House has begun reckoning with a striking dimension of its popularity: Many of the younger and foreign visitors who flock here nonetheless have little knowledge of the Holocaust — and sometimes none about Frank. The museum and some others dedicated to Jewish life are seeking new ways to address a declining understanding of World War II and the genocide that took the lives of six million Jews in Europe, efforts that have increasing relevance as anti-Semitic incidents intensify across parts of Europe and the United States. Read more...